Svestkova Alej (The Prune Song)
from "Czech American Polka Music in Wisconsin." by James P. Leary, pg. 33-53
In The Music of Multicultural America
By Kip Lornell and Anne K. Rasmussen



No streaming derivative is available.
This old time waltz, beginning with an introductory passage typical of Czech dance tunes, is dominated by the slurring, slightly dissonant trumpet of legendary bandleader Romy Gosz–whose brassy phrases are echoed by a second trumpet and a saxophone. Note, too, the parallel relaxed slur of the harmonized vocals. The characteristically precise and stately tempo established by the bass horn or tubas suited to dancers. The tinkling piano fills, meanwhile, are a jazz-age innovation, while the faintly martial drum rolls hard back to the marches favored by Czech brass bands.
1933, Chicago, Illinois.
Romy Gosz and His Orchestra. Romy Gosz-trumpet; Jim Jirikovic-trumpet; Linky Kohlbeck-saxophone and vocal; Fritz Puls-bass horn; Gordy Kohlbeck-piano; Andy Heier-drums and vocal
“Polka King” Romy Gosz, with trumpet, poses with his band at a wedding dance on a farm in the vicinity of Wisconsin’s Manitowoc and Kewaunee Counties, 1950s. Courtesy Jim Eisenmann.
Permission Information: SONY Music Entertainment (Vocalion 113782)
Keywords: polka music, waltz, dance music, dance band, Czech-Americans, Wisconsin, United States